What is a Pet Vaccinations?

A vaccination is the injection of a killed or weakened organism that produces immunity in your pet against that very organism. A vaccine is the product that carries that organism into your pet. Vaccines can be administered through needle injections, by mouth, or by aerosol. Vaccinations help protect your animals from known organisms that can bring harm or even death to your family pets. By vaccinating your pets, you are not only protecting them from these harmful organisms but you you are also helping to stop the spread of these diseases.


Types of Canine Vaccines

Rabies

Rabies Vaccine: A viral disease that causes encephalitis (infection in the brain) of all mammals. This disease is considered 100% fatal, in dogs as well as humans. State and Hays county law allows vaccinating pets every 3 years for rabies in some situations. Individual cities or counties may require it more frequently. We will issue 3-year vaccination certificates where appropriate, but it is the responsibility of the individual pet owner to ensure compliance with local laws.

DHPP

DHP/P* (Distemper Hepatitis Para influenza Parvovirus): We recommend an initial series of vaccines one month apart, generally 3 for puppies and 2 for adult dogs. We recommend at least 2 vaccines after the puppy is 12 weeks old. We then recommend vaccinating after 1 year, and every 3 years thereafter.

Distemper

Distemper Vaccine: A viral disease that causes pneumonia, vomiting, diarrhea, and often encephalitis in dogs and ferrets. Distemper is fatal in approximately 50% of cases. We also recommend vaccinating ferrets for this disease.

Hepatitis

Hepatitis Vaccine: Also known as adenovirus, this is a viral disease that affects the liver. It also sometimes affects the front part of the eye, causing a syndrome known as “blue eye.”

Parainfluenza

Parainfluenza Vaccine: A respiratory viral disease, this is one of the most common agents involved in “kennel cough” in dogs. (This is NOT “Canine Influenza”—see Canine Influenza)

Parvovirus

Parvovirus Vaccine: A highly contagious, highly fatal (especially in puppies) viral disease that causes vomiting and diarrhea.

Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis Vaccine: A highly fatal bacterial disease that affects the kidneys and often the liver. The leptospirosis vaccine is the most commonly implicated in serious vaccination reactions, especially for small dogs. Leptospirosis is contagious to humans. We try to identify at-risk dogs (dogs that spend a lot of time outdoors, swim, etc.) We use a vaccine that protects against four strains of the bacteria (the most currently available), many veterinarians only use two-serovar vaccines. An initial series of 2 vaccines is needed, for dogs over 12 weeks old, followed by annual boosters.

Bordetella

Bordetella Vaccine: A respiratory bacterial disease, this is another of the most common agents involved in “kennel cough” in dogs. We recommend annual vaccination for all dogs, as it is transmitted by airborne means and not just in boarding situations. One vaccine per year is generally sufficient.

Snakebite

Snakebite Vaccine: A vaccine does exist that has been shown to reduce illness and mortality in the event of a snakebite from Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes. We only recommend this as a special use vaccine, and will only use it after a thorough examination and owner consultation.

Canine Influenza

Canine Influenza Vaccine: Canine Influenza is an emerging disease in veterinary medicine. We do carry a vaccine for “doggie flu” but, like the snakebite vaccine, reserve it to “Special Use” status and will use it after a thorough examination and owner consultation.

Lymes

Lymes Vaccine: A bacterial disease carried by ticks, causing arthritis as its main symptom. The vaccine has been associated with serious side effects, including arthritis. This is not an endemic area for Lymes disease, and we do not recommend or offer this for routine vaccination.


Types of Feline Vaccines

Feline Rabies

Rabies Vaccine: A viral disease that causes encephalitis (infection in the brain) of all mammals. This disease is considered 100% fatal, in dogs as well as humans. State and Hays county law allows vaccinating pets every 3 years for rabies in some situations. Individual cities or counties may require it more frequently. We will issue 3-year vaccination certificates where appropriate, but it is the responsibility of the individual pet owner to ensure compliance with local laws.

FVRCP

FVRCP Vaccine (Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis Calicivirus Panleukopenia): We recommend an initial series of vaccines one month apart, generally 3 for kittens and 2 for adult cats. We then recommend vaccinating after 1 year, and every 3 years thereafter.

Rhinotracheitis

Rhinotracheitis Vaccine: A viral upper respiratory disease that may progress to pneumonia. Rhinotracheitis is caused by a herpes virus, but is not transmissible to other animals. Infected cats never get rid of the herpes virus, but may only intermittently show symptoms.

Calicivirus

Calicivirus Vaccine: Similar to Rhinotracheitis, this viral disease causes upper respiratory disease that may progress to pneumonia. Similar to herpes above, infected cats may remain persistently infected and only intermittently show symptoms.

Panleukopenia

Panleukopenia Vaccine: This is the feline form of parvovirus. It is a highly fatal (especially in kittens) virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea.

Feline Leukemia

Feline Leukemia Vaccine: Often abbreviated FeLV, this is a highly fatal viral disease of cats. This virus is transmitted by bites, grooming each other, or sharing food/water bowls. This vaccine is highly incriminated in causing serious reactions, including vaccine-associated tumors. This risk is minimized by using recombinant vaccines with no adjuvant (the only ones we use). However, because of the reaction possibility, we recommend vaccinating “at-risk” cats only. “At-risk” cats are kittens, those that go outside, live with an outside cat, live in a multi-cat (usually over five) household, or live with a leukemia-positive cat. Vaccination is an initial series for cats over 12 weeks old of 2 at one month intervals, then an annual booster, then every three years thereafter. Recent evidence shows that cats over four years old often have natural immunity, but we do not depend on this at this time.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Feline Infectious Peritonitis Vaccine: Often abbreviated FIP, this is also a highly fatal viral disease of cats. The mode of transmission is uncertain, and most current thoughts are that the vaccine offers zero protection. We do not recommend or offer routine vaccination for any cats.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia Vaccine: Also known as “pneumonitis”, this bacteria causes upper respiratory disease similar to Rhinotracheitis and Calicivirus. This bacterium most often causes disease only in catteries with high populations. This vaccine is highly incriminated in causing serious reactions. We only recommend vaccinating cats in catteries with a history of Chlamydia infection, and do not recommend or offer routine vaccination for any cats.

FIV

FIV Vaccine: Also known as Feline AIDS, a vaccine does exist. Because of potential side effects, widespread doubt about the efficacy of the vaccine, and interference with future FIV tests, we do not recommend or offer routine vaccination for any cats.


Things to consider when it comes to Pet Vaccinations

  • Is the vaccine necessary?
  • How effective is the vaccine?
  • How safe is the vaccine?
  • What is the animal’s age?
  • What is the general overall health?
  • What is the animal’s risk of exposure to the disease?
  • What is the prevalence of the disease in general?
  • What is your pet’s past vaccination history?
  • What is the pet’s lifestyle?


For More Information About Vaccinations

If you would like to know more information about vaccinations for your pets, please contact us.

(832) 639-4374